One Small Step
Apollo11logo
A Fortieth Anniversary Celebration of
Our First Step on Another World:
NASA's Apollo 11 Mission to the Moon

Thursday, July 16th - Sunday, July 19th, 2009
  • See a real rock brought back from the Moon.

  • Hear tales of the history and plans for the future of lunar exploration from expert lecturers and Observatory staff.

  • Track the "Stations of Apollo" and mark the progress of the Apollo 11 mission as it flew to the Moon forty years ago.

  • Discover how Apollo astronauts trained under the stars in Griffith Observatory's planetarium.

  • Snap a picture of your friends with a costumed astronaut.

  • Make your own crater on a simulated lunar surface.

  • Meet engineers who built the Apollo spacecraft.

  • Share your memories with friends and family.

On July 16, 1969, a powerful Saturn V rocket launched three men from Earth to the Moon, where, for the first time in history, people walked on the surface of another world.  The historic Apollo 11 mission was just the beginning of a journey of exploration that continues today.

Join Griffith Observatory's celebration of past triumphs and future possibilities. All activities are on-going throughout the day and evening, with the exception of the special program times listed below. Each activity is free and open to the public up to the capacity of the venue. All lectures are in the Leonard Nimoy Event Horizon.

Thursday, July 16, 2009:
12:00 noon  Stations of Apollo.
3:00 p.m.   The Moon Landings: Hoax or No Hoax? 
A half-hour lecture by Dr. David Reitzel, Griffith Observatory’s Astronomical Lecturer.
7:00 p.m. Stations of Apollo.
7:30 p.m.  The Moon Landings: Hoax or No Hoax? 
A half-hour lecture by Dr. David Reitzel, Griffith Observatory’s Astronomical Lecturer.

Friday, July 17, 2009:
12:00 noon  Stations of Apollo.
3:00 p.m Return to the Moon: What’s Next? 
A half-hour lecture by Mr. Tony Cook, Griffith Observatory’s Astronomical Observer.
7:00 p.m. Stations of Apollo.
7:30 p.m.   Return to the Moon: What’s Next? 
A half-hour lecture by Mr. Tony Cook, Griffith Observatory’s Astronomical Observer.

Saturday, July 18, 2009:
12:00 noon Stations of Apollo.
2:00 p.m. Remembering Apollo 11, a half-hour lecture by author Rod Pyle.
5:00 p.m. Remembering Apollo 11, a half-hour lecture by author Rod Pyle.
7:00 p.m. Stations of Apollo.
7:30 p.m. Why These Three? How Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins Wound Up on Apollo 11 
A one-hour lecture by Mr. Michael Cassutt, co-author of Deke! From Mercury to the Shuttle, and author of Red Moon and Tango Midnight.

Sunday, July 19, 2009:
11:30 a.m.  California Goes to the Moon
A one-hour panel discussion with southern California aerospace engineers that built the Apollo spacecraft; Sponsored by the Aerospace Legacy Foundation and moderated by Griffith Observatory’s Chris Butler.
12:00 noon Stations of Apollo.
3:45 p.m. California Goes to the Moon
A one-hour panel discussion with southern California aerospace engineers that built the Apollo spacecraft; Sponsored by the Aerospace Legacy Foundation and moderated by Griffith Observatory’s Chris Butler.
7:00 p.m.   Stations of Apollo.